Snow Crash

Oh. Yes. I am going to start off this post by talking about the absolutely brilliant book by Neal Stephenson (see Cryptonomicon), Snow Crash. The book that popularized the use of the word “avatar” as it applies to the Web and gaming. The book that inspired Google Earth. And despite being 20 years old, it is more relevant than ever and uses the cyberpunk theme to hilarious and thought-provoking extents. It paints the picture of an Internet/MMO mashup, sort of like Second Life, based in a franchised world. Governments have split up and been replaced in function by companies; competing highway companies set up snipers where their road systems cross, military companies bid for retired aircraft carriers, and inflation has caused trillion dollar bills to become nigh worthless.

In the book, a katana-wielding freelance hacker named Hiro Protagonist follows a trail of mysterious clues and eventually discovers a plot to infect people with an ancient Sumerian linguistic virus. The entire book is bizarre, but it has some great concepts and is absolutely entertaining. Stephenson never fails to tell a great story; his only problem is wrapping them up. Anyways, I highly suggest you read it.

Well, I’ve been thinking about games again. I have two great ideas in the works, and one of them is “hacking” game based roughly in the Snow Crash universe. It doesn’t really use any of the unique concepts from it besides the general post-fall world setting and things like the Central Intelligence Corporation. It probably won’t even use the Metaverse, although it depends how much I choose to expand the game from the core concept. The player does play, however, as a freelance hacker who may or may not wield swords (not that it matters, since you probably won’t be doing any running around).

I’m writing up a Project Design Document which will cover all the important points of the game:
Download the whole document

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Udacity

I was going to write this post a lot earlier, but I’ve had a lot on my plate recently; AP tests are coming up, track is coming to a close which means a slurry of meets, and I’ve been doing a Udacity course. Udacity is a site that offers free online courses in a video-lecture/machine-graded-homework format that allows thousands of people to participate in each course as it’s happening.

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It was created by the professors who taught the Stanford AI online course, which pioneered the format. It was a huge success, so they decided to create a separate organization which offered a variety of these free classes. They also bring in different people to teach the different courses.

For example, the web programming course that I’m taking is talk by one of the cofounders of Reddit, Steve Huffman. The course is quite interesting. Of courses, I taught myself HTML and PHP, but there are holes in my knowledge, both basic and advanced. The course filled some of those in, but it also teaches an area I’ve never worked in before.

The course is mostly about building an app using Google App Engine. For those who don’t know, App Engine runs a Python environment. You upload code and other files which, given a request, generate a response. You can map out various directories to either query code or directly draw HTML or other documents. Within the code, you have to write one or more handler classes which extend the App Engine API. They have functions for GET and POST requests, which then build a response. Google App Engine also has other functionality, such as data storage.

Anyways, posting will get back up to speed after the AP World History test, which marks the end of a lot of my business. Next post will be more TF2, so stay tuned.

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