Javascript

Honestly I’m not sure who thought it was good idea to make this language. I’ll admit its better than PHP, and I understand that some people actually enjoy using it. For instance, there is a web server written completely in JavaScript (hence my comparison to PHP). This boggles my mind.

My main issue with it is that there are no high level features built inherently into the language. For instance, there isn’t even an agreed upon method for importing other JavaScript files. Inheritance? Going to do some pretty messy hacks in order to get something that acts like an inheriting class structure. How about maps (aka dictionaries)? Objects and maps are the same thing. Arrays are basically just hash-maps for non-negative integers.

I suppose it’s about interesting exercise in thinking. Treating every structure (including classes and functions) as variables had its upsides. Ultimately, though, you have to use it whether you like it or not. There’s no substitute for the client-side functionality it provides. CSS can only go so far. When you start looking at something like AJAX, it makes you cry simultaneously at the pain of working with it and in joy for all the opportunity it provides.

The reason I have been thinking about and working with JavaScript (although only dabbling, of course) is that I’ve been taking another course at Udacity. This one is on game development in HTML5. Before this course, I really had no idea what HTML5 was. I had heard it mentioned, but then it all blew over. HTML5 is, to the best of my understanding, a standard that introduces some new HTML elements and JavaScript standards that lets developers manipulate pages in more creative ways.

For closing thoughts, I’ll leave you with this hilarious “talk”:

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Snow Crash

Oh. Yes. I am going to start off this post by talking about the absolutely brilliant book by Neal Stephenson (see Cryptonomicon), Snow Crash. The book that popularized the use of the word “avatar” as it applies to the Web and gaming. The book that inspired Google Earth. And despite being 20 years old, it is more relevant than ever and uses the cyberpunk theme to hilarious and thought-provoking extents. It paints the picture of an Internet/MMO mashup, sort of like Second Life, based in a franchised world. Governments have split up and been replaced in function by companies; competing highway companies set up snipers where their road systems cross, military companies bid for retired aircraft carriers, and inflation has caused trillion dollar bills to become nigh worthless.

In the book, a katana-wielding freelance hacker named Hiro Protagonist follows a trail of mysterious clues and eventually discovers a plot to infect people with an ancient Sumerian linguistic virus. The entire book is bizarre, but it has some great concepts and is absolutely entertaining. Stephenson never fails to tell a great story; his only problem is wrapping them up. Anyways, I highly suggest you read it.

Well, I’ve been thinking about games again. I have two great ideas in the works, and one of them is “hacking” game based roughly in the Snow Crash universe. It doesn’t really use any of the unique concepts from it besides the general post-fall world setting and things like the Central Intelligence Corporation. It probably won’t even use the Metaverse, although it depends how much I choose to expand the game from the core concept. The player does play, however, as a freelance hacker who may or may not wield swords (not that it matters, since you probably won’t be doing any running around).

I’m writing up a Project Design Document which will cover all the important points of the game:
Download the whole document

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